Work In Health and Social Care?

Do you often wonder why service users act the way they do? Have you noticed that behavioral approaches often fail to improve the situation?

What if there was a different way?

Well, there is! The Frankish Model of Trauma-Informed Care is based on evidence that changes in behaviour can be brought about by identifying the emotional development stage at which trauma occurred then targeting interventions to enable service users to progress to a more mature stage. Dr Pat Frankish, consultant clinical psychologist, developed this model over many years of working with people with intellectual disabilities and complex needs.

The Frankish Model of Trauma-Informed Care has four pillars:

Frankish Model of Trauma-Informed Care Diagram.


All of our courses are based on this model.

Montage of different words associated with trauma

Understanding and Using the Frankish Assessment of the Impact of Trauma (FAIT)

Identifying the emotional development stage at which trauma has occurred can be the first step in supporting service users to recover from trauma and progress to further emotional development stages.

On the basis of clinical experience and research, Dr Pat Frankish developed the Frankish Assessment of the Impact of Trauma. This observation tool is used to establish the emotional developmental stage. Following this, interventions can be put in place to provide a nurturing environment and facilitate progression to higher levels of emotional development, enabling service users to experience a better quality of life.  

Click here to find out more.

Picture of crying person with brain shown.

All Behaviour Has Meaning

Sigmund Freud is reported to have said ‘all behaviour has meaning’.
Dr Frankish emphasises that it’s our responsibility to work out the meaning behind the behaviour of the individuals we care for and to provide appropriate support. This course introduces you to the four key approaches to understanding behaviour: behavioural, cognitive, psychodynamic and systems. It explores the different techniques used in each approach and the importance of identifying the right approach to responding to behaviour.

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Photo by Erik Škof on Unsplash

DID: the Lived Experience

Co-presented by Dr Pat Frankish, consultant psychologist and psychotherapist, and a person who has lived with DID for many years, the course explores key aspects of DID such as, alters, triggers and programming. It challenges some of the common myths associated with DID and explains how to effectively support someone with DID. Primarily aimed at direct support staff, qualified practitioners may also benefit from the insights of living with DID from an expert-by-experience.

Click here to find out more.

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